I just love olive drab paint. I get goose pimples just thinking about it !

I just love olive drab paint. I get goose pimples just thinking about it !

 

One of the many things that can cause quite a “stir” is the discussion of paint…specifically lustreless olive drab paint. Paint called lusterless olive drab has been available at retail from a number of sources. Until recently none of the manufacturers (or retailers) have sufficiently documented their paint. Basically, this is olive drab, buy it or not.

A good friend of mine, Paul, at TM 9 Ordnance Paints decided to produce an authentic version of the WW2 lustreless olive drab. He really did his research to develop this paint. He first developed a modern version of the paint that used a catalyst as a hardner to leave a very tough finish. Die-hard purist had to wait a few months until he came out with a synethic enamel version of the paint that replicates the wear and finish of the original.You should know that during the war there was only ONE olive drab. These means that there wasn’t an early or late version of the paint that had any visual difference in the color. Some retailers claim there is an early vs. later, which just isn’t true. What is true is that the paint would look different with different batches or even within the same batch. There is so much angular material in the paint that it’s final shade can depend on how well you mix it. Manuals from back in the day acknowledge that the color would appear different with each paint job. This doesn’t mean that the color was hugely different. An interesting article about olive drab can be found at olive-drab.com.

For period articles about the paint used in WW2 and how to use it, you might be interested in my book – Military Maintenance for MB/Gpw Jeeps 1941-45.  It covers paint and much more!

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