Miliary Vehicles


Maybe you need information about the winterization of Willys MBs and Ford GPWs?

Can’t afford to get the NOS Winterization Kit or just can’t find one at WallyWorld? Well, get the next best thing that will have you drooling and begging for winter!

Winter and the Willys MB/Ford GPW has recieved favorable reviews from BOTH Military Vehicles Magazine and the MVPA Army Motors. Reflect on how to “winterize” your jeep. Learn how to install the Crew Compartment Heater and your feet are gauranteed never to freeze…boil, er, broil maybe but never freeze. Much more is covered!

Winter and the Willys MB/Ford GPW
by Robert Notman
Genre: U.S. Government

$24.49 PLUS SHIPPING.  Price subject to change.
Paperback: 83 pages

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Synopsis: A book that includes the gear issued by the US Army to winterize the WW2 jeep

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About This Book:

The 83 page book contains the instruction manual for installing the Winterization Kits that were issued during WW2. Frankly, when I started 20 years ago in this hobby I didn’t even know WW2 jeeps could have had a heater. There is information here about the slave kit…this allowed one jeep to be used as a starter vehicle for other vehicles that were too frozen to start on their own.

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Book Information:

· Paperback: 83 pages
· Binding: Perfect-Bound
· Publisher: Robert Notman (May 2004)
· Product Number: 11363108 (Click to order online!)

You can purchase this book not only from www.cafepress.com/42FordGPW

( Call TOLL FREE in the US: 877.809.1659 and ask for Product Number 11363108)

You will find this book interesting, if you are interested in the winter gear for the jeep. If you liked Becker’s book you are really going to like this book, the pictures from the installation manual are very clear. You can actually see the water line hookups and other featuers clearly. Get your copy today!

The Army is putting the new Bantam 4x4 pilot through testing.

The Army is putting the new Bantam 4×4 pilot through testing.

In many books and websites you see poor Lt. E.P. Hogan misquoted about where the name “jeep” came from. But he has some other interesting words as well.

An outstanding feature of the “bantam” is the success with which four wheel drive has been adapted to it. Its front axle can be used whether as a driving axle or an idling axle and, while the four-wheel drive feature in smaller vehicles is an adaptation of the Army’s usual design, in the “puddle-jumper” the resulting performance has been far greater even than anticipated. “Bugs” are built for maximum cross-country mobility – an indispensable requirement in modern warfare – which is greatly increased by having power in all four wheels.

Now Hogan was a QMC man but reading this it seems to say that the jeep wasn’t a “new” idea so much as its performance was outstanding.

Check out BANTAM, FORD AND WILLYS-1/4-TON RECONNAISSANCE CARS for more information about Bantam and the other pre-standardized jeeps.

How about a good book with lots of pictures covering the pre-standardized jeeps?
BANTAM, FORD AND WILLYS—1/4-TON RECONNAISSANCE CARS
The 1/4-ton, 4×4, truck of World War Two started out in the hands of the Infantry and a little company called American Bantam Car Company. Bantam worked with the Army’s Quartermaster Corps to produce the pilot model that was accepted and then fulfilled their initial contract for 70 trucks. During testing of the pilot both Ford and Willys-Overland were invited to check out this new vehicle. The vehicles were studied in great detail. Soon, at their own expense, Ford and Willys-Overland submitted pilots for testing too. This book covers the production prototypes–Bantam BRC-40, Ford GP and the Willys MA.

Print: $24.95 plus shipping.  Available through most booksellers.

 

Chicago school children collect enough money to purchase many jeeps, planes and a motorcycle.

Chicago school children collect enough money to purchase many jeeps, planes and a motorcycle.

Okay they didn’t actually get to keep the jeeps, planes, etc.  They donated enough money or purchased enough US savings stamps and bonds to allow the government to purchase the items. Of course during WW2 jeeps cost less than a $1000.  Today’s military vehicles cost considerably more, could children at a school raise enough money to by one for the government?  WW2 was a different time altogether.  WW2 was a “good” war and people in the US felt it was their patriotic duty to support the government and the military.

Picture source: Library of Congress, photo collection

Mr. Staaland with his WW2 – Jeep

WW2 jeep collectors can show up anywhere and everywhere. Jeeps may or may not be their first love. Take the “case” of Mr. Staaland and visit his website: Staaland Radio Collection.  He has an amazing collection of WW2 radios.  It appears he even has an Enigma machine.

Sometimes you just gotta have new parts.
Sometimes you just gotta have new parts.

Omix-Ada MB-FRONT Replacement Front Grill For Jeep Willys MB

Do you need a new front grill?  Then why not one by Omix?Omix-Ada MB-FRONT Replacement Front Grill For Jeep Willys MB is available through Amazon.

Omix-Ada has been supplying jeep replacement parts for years.  They carry a lot of what you need to work on your WW2 jeep.

The first jeep and it's by Bantam!

The first jeep and it’s by Bantam!

The WW2 jeep is famous around my house.  My grandsons, Marcos (10 yo) and his brother, Carlos (8.5 yo) love to ride in the jeep.  Every time they see the 1942 Ford GPW they say, “Can we go for a ride, grandpa?”  Who am I to turn them down?  Mainly we stick to the yard.  The jeep goes around trees and up and down little hills.  Next we blaze a trail through the neighborhood on familar streets.  Then it’s back to the yard and around the house a couple of more times before the jeep settles down and is put back in the garage.  The neighbors may think I’m nuts…but my grandsons think I’m the greatest!  What would you do?

You also might be interested in a book that I wrote about grandpa and WW2 jeeps, Grandpa’s War Pony is a book I wrote for my grandchildren to explain what a WW2 jeep was and how it was used.

Perhaps the greatest instrument of war to come out of the Second World War and forged into something still in use today is arguably—the 1/4-ton reconnaissance car or jeep. The jeep during WW2 was a new and speedy little vehicle designed to get in and go where motorcycles couldn’t go. It was the baby of a little company called American Bantam Car Company and the U. S. Army’s Infantry Branch.

The book is filled with colorized photos that have been stylized in a “cartoon” manner to help maintain children’s interest.

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