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Gotta rear seat?

Gotta rear seat?

Is your rear seat missing from your WW2 jeep?  It really should have a rear seat. Often in an unrestored jeep the rear seat will be missing.  This could be because Bubba didn’t need a rear seat and wanted that little bit of extra space to haul groceries to the farm.  Well, I’ve found a pretty good solution to your problem Bunky.

Rear Seat Frame for Willys MB 1941-45
Is your WW2 jeep without a rear seat frame? Mine was….of course it didn’t have a rear panel either! Rear Seat Frame for 1941-45 Willys MB Replaces part number: A2782 Can be used in 1942-45 Ford GPWs but of course will not have the “F” mark.
The part is from OMIX-ADA.
Sometimes the WW2 jeep can be hard to shift.

Sometimes the WW2 jeep can be hard to shift.

Maybe one of these reasons are why…check out the solution.

Interlock plunger missing

Remove transmission and transfer case, install interlock

Clutch fails to release
Adjust clutch pedal free travel or replace

Gear shift end worn or damaged; binding in housing
Replace

Shift plate worn or bent
Replace

Shift rods binding in case
Replace, check case for damage

Transmission loose on bell housing
Tighten

Clutch shaft pilot binding in bushing case or shift housing damaged
Replace pilot bushing, measure pilot end for tolerance, examine housing

And of course the easiest reason might be not enough free play on the clutch.

 

WW2 Jeep Tire Pressure Stencils?

I’m not fond of being pressured but I do like to keep the correct tire pressure on the jeep.  One way to keep it right is to paint the proper tire pressure near by. And while this is often thought of as a post-war phenomenon but here I can present some evidence that it actually appeared in the late WW2 era!

WDC 174 ( 12 Jun. 45) says tire pressures are to be stenciled on vehicles—the tire pressure prescribed in TM 31-200. (Pending revision of this TM, the latest list of correct tire pressures appears in TB 31-200-7, 23 May 45.) Here’s where it goes: On the instrument panel (prominently displayed) of all wheeled, general purpose, special equipment, and special purpose vehicles— in the driver’s compartment (prominently displayed) of all tank-like wheeled combat-vehicles—on the outside of the fender, or on the body near the wheels, of trailers and semitrailers.

The markings should be legible block or stencil-type letters, not over one inch high, and put on with approved white, lusterless, stenciling, synthetic enamel, except when the area to be marked is painted white; then, the markings go in approved black, lusterless, stenciling, synthetic enamel.

From Military Maintenance for MB/GPW Jeeps 1941-45 which is available through booksellers everywhere or directly from the publisher.

I just hate it when the valves on my jeep stick. I've notice it seems to happen when I leave the old girl sitting without much attention...like over a winter or longer!

I just hate it when the valves on my jeep stick. I’ve notice it seems to happen when I leave the old girl sitting without much attention…like over a winter or longer!

Dear Half-Mast,

In the past week we have
run into some trouble with
valves sticking on – 1/4-ton
jeeps. We tore a vehicle down
and found the exhaust valves
not only gummed up, but a
corrosive action had taken
place about half-way down
the valve stem causing a
severe pitting. There was
also considerable traces of
rust on the valve stem. The
condition was only prevalent
on the exhaust valves.
As a corrective measure, we
reseated and ground all
valves and thoroughly
cleaned up the valve guides,
removing all sludge and carbon
from the motor and
crankcase. We also checked
the motor thoroughly for water
leaks, but were unable to
find any. Upon completion of
this work, we assembled the
motor and as could be expected,
we had a very smooth
running motor.

We have come to the conclusion
that this condition
was due to the fact that the
1/4-ton jeeps are not permitted
to operate off the post and
are used only in short runs
around the post. This does
not permit them to attain
normal operating temperatures
– which undoubtedly
causes excessive crankcase
dilution and sludge and
creates the described condition.
We are wondering if you
have had any similar experiences
and if our diagnosis is
correct and what your recommendations
are in correcting
this trouble.
F. P. L.
Automotive Tech. Adviser

Dear F.P.L.,
You hit it on the head—cold
crankcases collecting sludge,
etc. – both Willys and Ford
seem to agree with you, because
both companies are
adding crankcase ventilating
systems to their 1/4-tons in
production (so far, it has not
been decided to issue kits for
field installation of the ventilating
system). Back in January,
we carried a description
of the ventilating system to
be installed in GMC’s which
should give you a rough idea
of what it ‘ll look like on the
1/4-tons.

However, if drivers are
properly trained, they will
bring the engine to operating
temperature before moving
their vehicle – just plain old
lst-echelon ‘Engine Warm-up’
will go a long ways towards
correcting your trouble.

Half-Mast

From Military Maintenance for MB/GPW Jeeps 1941-45 which is available through booksellers everywhere or directly from the publisher.

You are certainly looking at a large task to collect 88 different tools including the toolbox.

I like to have the right tool for the right job–don’t you?

Tools. Every Army needs them and the US Army was no exception. Lists of authorized tools for “Truck Companies” were published by the Quartermaster Corp. The volume I have seen was published in 1943 in TM 10-475 “Quartermaster Handbook” that I obtained from Jeff Quirin, Quirin’s Military Collectibles of Arizona,QMCAZ@theriver.com of AZ.

Of course the tool sets for Willys MB and Ford GPW jeeps are by now well known. You can see a wonderful display of original tools on www.g503.com.

Both files are from QuarterMaster Handbook TM 10-475 Truck Company.In this section, “Tools”, military jeeps tools that I have collected over the years are displayed. Some of them are only representative of the originals others are genuine. You will also find articles taken from the original World War Two magazine Army Motors that describe “newly” issued tools or improvised tools designed by GIs in the field. I hope you find it as interesting as I do!

 

What parts do I need to purchase to work on my WW2 jeep transmission??

What parts do I need to purchase to work on my WW2 jeep transmission??

This is a question you will be able to answer only after you have torn down your transmission, cleaned and inspected the parts.  However, Richard Grace suggests, “the minimum parts replacement would have to be a Small Parts Kit which includes main drive gear rollers, thrust washers, synchronizer dogs and springs. One other almost necessity is mainline bearings.” 

Of course you will want a new clutch disk and throw-out bearing (you might consider a new pressure plate as well).  So for a minimum investment (perhaps for less than $100, not including clutch disk and pressure plate) you could have a rebuilt transmission ready to install in your jeep.  Anyway a lot less than a so called rebuilt transmission from a vendor and you will have the satisfaction of knowing you did it yourself.  You will need to add to your costs any defective or out of tolerance parts that you find during the cleaning and inspection process.

For much more about the WW2 jeep transmission, T-84J, check out my book – Trouble Shooting And Rebuilding The T-84J. This book, written by me, will take you through the process step by step–with lots of pictures!

Backlash! I'm not talking about someone getting back at you for something you did or didn't do. No, I'm talking about your teeth. Well, your T-84's teeth on the gears, that is.

Backlash! I’m not talking about someone getting back at you for something you did or didn’t do. No, I’m talking about your teeth. Well, your T-84’s teeth on the gears, that is.

BACKLASH – Play between teeth of two gears which are in mesh (or engaged).
Check out 42FordGPW.com for more about WW2 jeeps and related information.

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