Jonathan’s jeep.

Jonathan Frank’s father drove a WW2 jeep home from the war.  He drove from California to North Carolina.  Once home he parked it in a barn on the farm and said he would never drive it again.  However, his son, Jonathan and his brother, drove the jeep on the farm.  Over the years he has rebuilt it at least three times.  The most recent rebuilt was initiated when his own son blew the rear differential.  Jonathan admits that the jeep is a work in progress and that it is only about 80 percent original.  The winch on the front was a gift from his brother’s old jeep.  He also purchased some disc brakes from me.  One thing for sure I bet Jonathan has a blast driving the jeep!

For a few more pictures look here.

You might be interested in learning more about  WW2. Eyewitness to World War II: Unforgettable Stories and Photographs From History’s Greatest Conflict gives a glimpse into the personal lives from the war. You will find personal letters and rarely seen photos. It’s a very interesting book.

I just love the T-84 jeep transmission. But was it used in any other vehicles?

I just love the T-84 jeep transmission. But was it used in any other vehicles?

The short answer is yes! This question comes up fairly often so I’m repeating a previous post for the newer folks.  Also, the T-84 was used in the Studebaker Weasel.

The T-84 was not just used in the WW2 jeep.  The jeep used the T-84J.  Below are listed several (but not all) of the various vehicles that used a T-84.  I didn’t bother to list them but there was at least one car, a Studebaker, that used a T-84 after the war.

Information extracted from The Hollander.

T-84A-1, 1A and T84B-1A
Continental Late ‘32-33 Flyer
Graham 36 80 Crusader

T84-1
Continental ‘32 Beacon, Early Flyer

T-84C-1
Mack ‘37-40 2M4A
Reo Truck ‘36-39 4-75, 3/4 ton

T84D-16
Willys ‘38-39 Pass.
Willys ‘39 Overland

T-84E-16
Bantam ‘38-40

T-84F-1
Stude ‘39-40 Champion (over drive)

T-84G-16
Nash ‘41-42 40

AS1 T-84J
Am Bantam (Jeep) 40 BRC 1/4T 4×4

AS1 T-84J
Willys 41-45 Army 1/4T

AS2 T-84J
Ford Jeep ‘42-45 GPW 1/4 T 4×4

T84H-1
Bantam 41-42

The T-84 gets a rap for being a bad and weak transmission.  You have to wonder why it was used in some many cars (and trucks!) for so long a period of time, if better transmissions were available.

For more about the T-84 WW2 jeep transmission, check out my book  –  Trouble Shooting And Rebuilding The T-84J.  You really can rebuild a WW2 jeep transmission.

 

Grandpa's War Pony

Grandpa’s War Pony

Grandpa’s War Pony is a book I wrote for my grandchildren to explain what a WW2 jeep was and how it was used.

Perhaps the greatest instrument of war to come out of the Second World War and forged into something still in use today is arguably—the 1/4-ton reconnaissance car or jeep. The jeep during WW2 was a new and speedy little vehicle designed to get in and go where motorcycles couldn’t go. It was the baby of a little company called American Bantam Car Company and the U. S. Army’s Infantry Branch.

The book is filled with colorized photos that have been stylized in a “cartoon” manner to help maintain children’s interest.

Grandpa’s War Pony is available from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

Sometimes you just want to have fun, right? Well, why not make a jeep? From a paper cut out , that is.

Bantam was the very first jeep.

 

File:Bantam-no1-194009.jpg

Bantam Reconnaissance Car

When it became obvious that the United States was eventually going to become involved in the war raging in Europe, the U.S. Army contacted 135 companies asking for working prototypes of a four-wheel-drive reconnaissance car. Only two companies responded to the request, The American Bantam Car Company and Willys-Overland. The Army had set what seemed like an impossible deadline of 49 days to supply a working prototype. Willys asked for more time but was refused. The bankrupt American Bantam Car Company had a small engineering staff left on the payroll and solicited Karl Probst, a talented freelance designer from Detroit to put the design down on paper. After turning down Bantam’s initial request, Probst responded to an Army request and commenced work, initially without salary, on July 17, 1940.

Bantam Pilot model being put through testing by the US Army.

Bantam Pilot model being put through testing by the US Army.

Probst laid out full plans for the Bantam prototype, known as the BRC or Bantam Reconnaissance Car, in just two days, working up a cost estimate the next. Bantam’s bid was submitted complete with blueprints on July 22.  While much of the vehicle could be assembled from off-the-shelf automotive parts, custom four-wheel drivetrain components were to be supplied by Spicer. The hand-built prototype was completed in Butler, Pennsylvania, and driven to Camp Holabird, Maryland, for Army testing September 21. The vehicle met all the Army’s criteria except its engine torque requirements.  Everyone that saw it loved it and saw the potential.

For those interested in finding out more about the Bantam, you should considering reading Project Management in History: The First Jeep (Project Management in History Series) (Volume 1) and Jeep – Its development and procurement under the Quartermaster Corps, 1940-1942.

Project Management in History: The First Jeep (Project Management in History Series) (Volume 1) is a great book that illuminates the role played by the first company to built the jeep. That company was the American Bantam Car Company.

Jeep – Its development and procurement under the Quartermaster Corps, 1940-1942 is a book written by a historian within the War Department while the war was ongoing. It does a good job in describing the roles played by the three companies that built the majority of the jeeps during WW2. Only two of those companies Ford and Willys would produced vast numbers of jeeps totaling over 600,000. The American Bantam Car Company would produce less than 3000.

Taking both books together is an excellent history of the early jeep.

Willys MB Standardized Grille

Drawing of the grille or brush guard of the Willys-Overland MB. The drawing is copyrighted by o5m6.de and is used here with permission. This is the standard jeep vehicle. It is interesting to note that the grille used on the MB was actually designed by a worker at Ford named Clarence F. Kramer.
WW2 jeep girl with a WW2 jeep grill.

WW2 jeep girl with a WW2 jeep grill.

Check out the excellent work of Oliver at http://www.o5m6.de/ for even more WW2 vehicles. The emphasis is on Russian vehicles but also includes foreign designed vehicles as used by the Russians. It’s a great site, check it out.

This concludes the series on WW2 jeep grilles, we hope you enjoyed it. For more about WW2 jeeps see Military Jeep: 1940 Onwards (Ford, Willys and Hotchkiss) (Enthusiasts’ Manual).

Band of Brothers is a great mini-series.

Band of Brothers is a great mini-series.

Band of Brothers was a great HBO miniseries from 2002.  Plenty of action…maybe almost too much.   In the series you follow the men of Easy Company from the start of boot camp to the end of WWII.  The series from Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks is a great HBO miniseries.  It is an intense take on war.  The first time I watched it was a moving experience.  It’s a show you are not going to miss.   It was nominated for 19 Emmy® Awards.  There are ten episodes plus an 80-min. documentary.  Band of Brothers is also available on Blu-Ray: Band of Brothers [Blu-ray]

You might be interested in the book Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest.

Willys MB Early Grille “Slat Grille”

Wouldn't you just love to have a Willys MB Slat Grille?

Wouldn’t you just love to have a Willys MB Slat Grille?

Drawing of the grille or brush guard of the Willys-Overland MB. The drawing is copyrighted by o5m6.de and is used here with permission. This is the early version of the standardized jeep. Willys had won the contract for 16,000 standardized jeeps. Early production had a welded grille. Collectors often refer to these as “slate grille” jeeps.

Check out the excellent work of Oliver at http://www.o5m6.de/ for even more WW2 vehicles. The emphasis is on Russian vehicles but also includes foreign designed vehicles as used by the Russians. It’s a great site, check it out.

You might be interested in more about the WW2 jeep — Jeep – Its development and procurement under the Quartermaster Corps, 1940-1942.

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