Do you ever think about jeep parts? I do...

Do you ever think about jeep parts? I do…

The WW2 jeep like any vehicle is made up of thousands of parts.  The parts are not all made by the automobile manufacturer.  Other companies produce the parts that are used in the vehicle.  This was true with the Ford and the Willys WW2 jeep.  One relatively small but impart part was the two Bristol screws used in the T-84 jeep transmission.

Bristol Screws were used in the T-84J transmission.

Bristol Screws were used in the T-84J transmission.

According to Wikipedia: The Bristol screw drive is a spline with four or six splines, which are not necessarily tamper resistant. The grooves in the wrench are cut by a square-cornered broach, giving a slight undercut to the outer corners of the driver. The main advantage to this drive system is that almost all of the turning force is applied at right angles to the fastener spline face, which reduces the possibility of stripping the fastener. For this reason Bristol screw drives are often used in softer, non-ferrous metals. Compared to an Allen drive, Bristol drives are less likely to strip for the same amount of torque; however the Bristol drive is not much more strip resistant than a Torx drive. It was created by the Bristol Wrench Company.

The arrows point to Bristol Screws in the T-84J transmission that must be removed in order to remove the rails.

The arrows point to Bristol Screws in the T-84J transmission that must be removed in order to remove the rails.

The T-84J transmission is used in the WW2 jeep.  It is a very basic transmission and relatively easy to work on.  You only need a few tools and either the TM 9-1803B Power Train, Body, and Frame for Willys Overland Model MB and Ford Model GPW 1/4 Ton 4×4 Technical Manual or my own book, Trouble Shooting and Rebuilding the T-84J Transmission, that goes into much more detail.

Army Jill on Four Jills in a Jeep on DVD

Army Jill on Four Jills in a Jeep on DVD

What’s not to like?  What GI isn’t going to love looking at four attractive women? And then of course there’s the star of the movie–the Jeep!

Four Jills in a Jeep - DVD

Four Jills in a Jeep – DVD

Four Jills in a Jeep on DVD.  This star studded musical is a cinematic tribute to the successful USO tour of Kay Francis, Martha Raye, Mitzi Mayfair and Carole Landis who entertained soldiers from England to North Africa. Embellished with some fictional romance, striking choreography and plenty of laughs, this patriotic film salutes all the entertainers who did their part for “the boys.” Includes special appearances by Alice Faye, Betty Grable, Carmen Miranda, George Jessel and the Jimmy Doresy Orchestra.   The film is from 1942.
Four Jills in a Jeep – Publicity still.

See the blog Film Noir Photos for a bit more!

 

Are you working on your jeep? How about the carburetor? Is it time you over hauled it?

Are you working on your jeep? How about the carburetor? Is it time you over hauled it?

Now that spring is officially here in most of the country, maybe it is time to start working on your jeep.  One of the things you can do is to repair your carb.  Sometimes using  a repair kit is your most cost effective option.  Omix-Ada 17705.04 Carburetor Repair Kit is available at a reasonable price.

If repairing your carb is not an option or beyond your skills, you might go with a brand new Omix-Ada 17701.01 Carburetor.  This is not a cheap option but it will really make your jeep pick up and take notice.  I tried this option while waiting for a rebuilt WW2 jeep carb.  It will take some getting used to as it doesn’t have a choke as we know it.  If you want to more about the Solex carburetor, click the link.

When it comes to the jeep, Major General Lynch is my hero.

When it comes to the jeep, Major General Lynch is my hero.

He was an early believer and was very helpful in nudging things along at the very beginning.  He actually retired before the entry of the US in WW2.  But he helped deliver one of the most important tools used in that war–the jeep.

Maj Gen George A. Lynch, Chief of Infantry

Maj Gen George A. Lynch, Chief of Infantry

There’s an individual that you may not know but was very instrumental in the development of the jeep. He was the Chief of Infantry from 1937 to 1941. It was his insight that guided his staff to search for a vehicle that would replace the horse and the motorcycle as used by the Infantry. That vehicle was the Bantam BRC and it would become famous and known as the jeep.Major General George A. Lynch, one of the fathers of the jeep died August 10, 1962 at the age of 82. He had retired 1 May 1941 from the Army, after serving in the Army for 41 years. You can find out more about General Lynch’s part in developing and procuring the jeep by reading Jeep – Its development and procurement under the Quartermaster Corps, 1940-1942.  The book is available through Amazon.com and other booksellers.

You also might be interested in BANTAM, FORD AND WILLYS-1/4-TON RECONNAISSANCE CARS for more information about the general and the early jeep development.

Army Jill and the WW2 jeep.

I depend on my jeep to get me where I’m goin’. Make sure you know how to troubleshot your T-84 jeep transmission.

SYMPTOMS PROBABLE REMEDY
Slips Out of High Gear
Transmission misaligned with Bell Housing Align transmission case to Bell Housing and Bell Housing to Engine
End play in Main Drive Gear Tighten front retainer or bearing requires bushing
Damaged Pilot Bearing or Front Bearing Replace
Bent Shifting Fork Replace
Interlock Plunger Not in Place Install
Slips Out of Second
Bent Shifting Fork Replace
Worn Gear Replace
Weak Poppet Spring Replace
Interlock Plunger Not in Place Install
Noise in Low Gear
Rear Ball Bearing Broken Replace
Gear Teeth Pitted or Worn Replace Gears
Shifting Fork Bent Replace
Lack of Lubrication Drain and Refill
Slips Out of Gear
Weak or broken poppet spring Replace
Interlock plunger not in place Install plunger
Transmission gears or bearings worn Replace
Shift fork bent, causing partial gear engagement Replace
Transmission loose on bell housing Tighten
Damaged bell housing Replace

For these tips and more see my book….

Trouble Shooting And Rebuilding The T-84J
from Amazon and other fine book stores!

Curl up with a good read about your favorite vehicle or a related subject!

Curl up with a good read about your favorite vehicle or a related subject!

I just love a good read. What could be better than reading up on the WW2 jeep or how to work on WW2 era vehicles? You can’t go wrong with this publication. It will have stuff for the novice as well as the old hand.

 

Automotive Trouble Shooting for WW2 Vehicles, Volume 2 Automotive Trouble Shooting For World War Two Wheeled Vehicles, Volume 2, is a useful manual for anyone and it takes off where volume one ended! Learn about the engine oil system. Do you know what to look for when rebuilding a block? Problems with valves? Find out how to trouble shoot and adjust the valves for wheeled vehicles. Do you have problems with the clutch rattling? Check this manual out!Worried about your transmission or transfer case making noises? Check out the trouble shooting section. Any noises coming from your propeller shafts, universal joints or axles? Its discussed here. Trouble shooting the wheels, hubs, and rims? Chassis. Steering.Do you have brake problems, including Hydrovac brakes? Its all here and much more.Put a copy in your WW2 truck for those little roadside emergencies! Originally produced by the US Gov’t, Ordnance School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, August, 1945. Edited by Robert Notman. Click on the link above to find out how to order the book.

Can your jeep swim?

Can your jeep swim?

I guess there wasn’t enough boats. But if you gave a few men a large enough tarpaulin, some poles and maybe some bales of hay–you could float a jeep across a stream. Pretty amazing stuff, if you think about it. And no, I’m not about to take my jeep for a swim anytime soon. I’ll just let it take me to the swimming hole and go for a swim myself.

 

 

One of the early (first 70) Bantam jeeps undergoing river stream crossing tests. Those “pontoons” were made by using canvas tarpaulins covering bales of hay, Infantry Journal, May, 1942.

With a little help from its friends! Early during the war all sorts of testing was done on jeeps including the Bantams. As mentioned in the caption above this is a very early jeep from the first contract of 70 vehicles. Only one of these are known to have survived and it is in the Smithsonian collection. Find out more about the Bantam in BANTAM, FORD AND WILLYS-1/4-TON RECONNAISSANCE CARS. You also might be interested in Military Maintenance for MB/GPW Jeeps 1941-45.